Food is a tool of identification and communication, uniting a community or group through common dietary practice.

Community Projects

We want to bring our know-how to your community!

Improving healthy eating within communities is no easy task. We aim to give people the opportunity, skills and confidence to access a healthy diet for themselves, their families and their communities. We aim to achieve this by working closely with organisations and services to access funding, and offer FREE enjoyable initiatives that addresses health inequalities and barriers (affordability, cooking skills and culture) to healthy eating. 

Our partners have included schools, faith groups, charities, local authorities and supermarkets.  We seek to engage people who don’t normally access health services and where possible establish and support health trainers to provide sustainability and new activities for their community. Contact us today and lets work in partnership.

Cupboard Essentials

If you are in a rush to cook dinner and haven’t had time to get to the shops, store cupboard essentials can save the day.

Tinned foods Dry foods Other
  • Fruit
  • Vegetables (in water)
  • Beans & peas
  • Potatoes (in water)
  • Mackerel, sardines (in water)
  • Lentils
  • Pasta
  • Rice
  • Noodles
  • Oats
  • Flour
  • Milk powder
  • Oil
  • Vinegar
  • Stock cubes (reduced salt)
  • Herbs and spices

Our Community Cook n Eat Programme

For many parents, the reluctance to cook from scratch is down to a number of barriers which prevent them from making healthier meals for their families.

  1. Costs too much money to cook healthier meals
  2. Takes too much time that they’re too busy
  3. Children are too fussy and won’t eat healthy foods

Our cooking programme ‘My Goodness’ assists in cooking quick, healthy and affordable meals, through 100% hands-on cooking sessions, peer learning, group discussion and evidence based literature. An evaluation report is written at the end of each programme to evidence participants achievements and comments.

Cooking Class

Money Savers

  • Compare food prices per 100g rather than the price per packet (this is displayed on the shelf ticket for most products) could help you make a cheaper choice.
  • Try buying value or basic range foods – judge the food behind the label rather than the label itself.
  • Buy frozen, dried and tinned fruit and vegetables they save waste and money.
  • Lentils, broad beans and kidney beans can be added to curries, chilli and casseroles rather than or with meat which makes the meal go further and is much cheaper.

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